Books recommended by Yuval Noah Harari
3 books

Yuval Harari 3 Fresh Book Recommendations

Yuval spoke to The Guardian and recommended top 3 books that guaranteed will blow you away and distract from uninspiring lockdown life. Check this out!
Yuval Noah Harari
Scientist
Yuval spoke to The Guardian and recommended top 3 books that guaranteed will blow you away and distract from uninspiring lockdown life. Check this out!
Books from Yuval Noah Harari

The Gulag Archipelago

'[The Gulag Archipelago] helped to bring down an empire. Its importance can hardly be exaggerated' Doris Lessing, Sunday Telegraph WITH A NEW FOREWORD BY JORDAN B. PETERSONA vast canvas of camps, prisons, transit centres and secret police, of informers and spies and interrogators but also of everyday heroism, The Gulag Archipelago is Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's grand masterwork. Based on the testimony of some 200 survivors, and on the recollection of Solzhenitsyn's own eleven years in labour camps and exile, it chronicles the story of those at the heart of the Soviet Union who opposed Stalin, and for whom the key to survival lay not in hope but in despair.A thoroughly researched document and a feat of literary and imaginative power, this edition of The Gulag Archipelago was abridged into one volume at the author's wish and with his full co-operation. 'Solzhenitsyn’s masterpiece...The Gulag Archipelago helped create the world we live in today' Anne Applebaum THE OFFICIALLY APPROVED ABRIDGEMENT OF THE GULAG ARCHIPELAGO VOLUMES I, II & III
Yuval Noah Harari
Scientist
Alexander Solzhenitsyn describes the Soviet conference in Stalin's day, when the audience clapped their hands enthusiastically to applaud Stalin. After a few minutes of clapping everybody became very nervous. They were all tired of clapping, but nobody wanted to be the first to stop.
Books recommended by Yuval Noah Harari
28 books

Yuval Noah Harari Books - 28 Favorite Reads

Yuval Noah Harari is a massive book fan. Here is the list of the most prominent reads from the scientist.
Yuval Noah Harari
Scientist
Yuval Noah Harari is a massive book fan. Here is the list of the most prominent reads from the scientist.
TV Shows from Yuval Noah Harari

Game of Thrones

Seven noble families fight for control of the mythical land of Westeros. Friction between the houses leads to full-scale war. All while a very ancient evil awakens in the farthest north. Amidst the war, a neglected military order of misfits, the Night's Watch, is all that stands between the realms of men and icy horrors beyond.
Yuval Noah Harari
Scientist
GAME OF THRONES is a Shakespearean drama besieged by a zombie movie. It revolves around the question “What is power?,” and in its more profound moments it offers a leisurely meditation on the fluidity of authority. At other times, it just bombards viewers with the latest special effects.
Music from Yuval Noah Harari

Hamilton

Yuval Noah Harari
Scientist
What’s your summer soundtrack? The Hamilton soundtrack with a sprinkling of 1980s pop
People from Yuval Noah Harari

S. N. Goenka

Yuval Noah Harari
Scientist
I learned the meditation from a teacher called SN Goenka and it completely blew my mind.
Countries from Yuval Noah Harari

India

India (Hindi: ), officially the Republic of India (Hindi: ), is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country, and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal on the southeast, it shares land borders with Pakistan to the west; China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the north; and Bangladesh and Myanmar to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka and the Maldives; its Andaman and Nicobar Islands share a maritime border with Thailand and Indonesia. Modern humans arrived on the Indian subcontinent from Africa no later than 55,000 years ago. Their long occupation, initially in varying forms of isolation as hunter-gatherers, has made the region highly diverse, second only to Africa in human genetic diversity. Settled life emerged on the subcontinent in the western margins of the Indus river basin 9,000 years ago, evolving gradually into the Indus Valley Civilisation of the third millennium BCE. By 1200 BCE, an archaic form of Sanskrit, an Indo-European language, had diffused into India from the northwest, unfolding as the language of the Rigveda, and recording the dawning of Hinduism in India. The Dravidian languages of India were supplanted in the northern regions. By 400 BCE, stratification and exclusion by caste had emerged within Hinduism, and Buddhism and Jainism had arisen, proclaiming social orders unlinked to heredity. Early political consolidations gave rise to the loose-knit Maurya and Gupta Empires based in the Ganges Basin. Their collective era was suffused with wide-ranging creativity, but also marked by the declining status of women, and the incorporation of untouchability into an organised system of belief. In south India, the Middle kingdoms exported Dravidian-languages scripts and religious cultures to the kingdoms of southeast Asia. In the early medieval era, Christianity, Islam, Judaism and Zoroastrianism put down roots on India's southern and western coasts. Armies from Central Asia intermittently overran India's plains, eventually establishing the Delhi sultanate, and drawing northern India into the cosmopolitan networks of medieval Islam. In the 15th century, the Vijayanagara Empire created a long-lasting composite Hindu culture in south India. In the Punjab, Sikhism emerged, rejecting institutionalised religion. The Mughal empire, in 1526, ushered in two centuries of relative peace, leaving a legacy of luminous architecture. Gradually expanding rule of the British East India Company followed, turning India into a colonial economy, but also consolidating its sovereignty. British Crown rule began in 1858. The rights promised to Indians were granted slowly, but technological changes were introduced, and ideas of education, modernity and the public life took root. A pioneering and influential nationalist movement emerged, which was noted for nonviolent resistance and led India to its independence in 1947. India is a secular federal republic governed in a democratic parliamentary system. It is a pluralistic, multilingual and multi-ethnic society. India's population grew from 361 million in 1951 to 1,211 million in 2011. During the same time, its nominal per capita income increased from US$64 annually to US$1,498, and its literacy rate from 16.6% to 74%. From being a comparatively destitute country in 1951, India has become a fast-growing major economy, a hub for information technology services, with an expanding middle class. It has a space programme which includes several planned or completed extraterrestrial missions. Indian movies, music, and spiritual teachings play an increasing role in global culture. India has substantially reduced its rate of poverty, though at the cost of increasing economic inequality. India is a nuclear weapons state, which ranks high in military expenditure. It has disputes over Kashmir with its neighbours, Pakistan and China, unresolved since the mid-20th century. Among the socio-economic challenges India faces are gender inequality, child malnutrition, and rising levels of air pollution. India's land is megadiverse, with four biodiversity hotspots. Its forest cover comprises 21.4% of its area. India's wildlife, which has traditionally been viewed with tolerance in India's culture, is supported among these forests, and elsewhere, in protected habitats.
Yuval Noah Harari
Scientist
For more than a decade, Harari has spent several weeks each year on a silent-meditation retreat, usually in India.