Movies from Joker

The Man Who Laughs

Gwynplaine, son of Lord Clancharlie, has a permanent smile carved on his face by the King, in revenge for Gwynplaine's father's treachery. Gwynplaine is adopted by a travelling showman and becomes a popular idol. He falls in love with the blind Dea. The king dies, and his evil jester tries to destroy or corrupt Gwynplaine.
Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Kane noted how the playing card looked like Conrad Veidt, who played a man with a freakish perma-grin in the 1928 German Expressionist film The Man Who Laughs. Kane denied this, saying that Robinson’s card was merely a place holder. The real Joker, Kane claims, was inspired by Veidt after Finger pointed to a picture of him and said, “Here’s The Joker.” Regardless of who officially merits credit for the character’s inspiration, the creation of The Joker was a team effort, from three hall-of-fame comic book guys.
Movies from Joker

Serpico

The real-life struggle of an honest New York City cop against a corrupt system.
Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
“Serpico” (1973) Sidney Lumet’s 1973 crime drama “Serpico” stars Al Pacino as New York Police Department officer Frank Serpico, whose undercover mission to expose corruption within the NYPD made him a whistleblower with a target on his back. Pacino was Oscar nominated for the role, while Lumet’s grounded realism was championed for giving the film a lived-in, visceral tone. The latter of which is a top priority for Phillips in “Joker.” The director said part of his pitch for “Joker” was telling Warner Bros. that he was making a 1970s character study like “Serpico,” but dressed up as a 2019 comic book movie.
Movies from Joker

Zorro, The Gay Blade

George Hamilton stars in a dueling dual role as twin sons of the legendary Zorro. Soon after the dashing Don Diego Vega inherits his father's famous sword and costume, a broken ankle prevents the masked avenger from fulfilling his heroic duties. When his flamboyantly fashion-conscious brother assumes the secret identity to continue an ongoing fight for justice, the results are nothing short of hilarious!
Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Joker ends with yet another version of the Wayne family’s murder. As always, they are seen exiting a movie theater which, in this case, is screening the action comedy Zorro, The Gay Blade starring George Hamilton. Most tellings of Batman’s origins involve the Waynes going to see a Zorro movie on the night of their deaths — which is often used to partly explain where Bruce gets the idea of avenging their murders by wearing a dark costume and hiding his identity. Given Joker’s setting in the early 1980s, Zorro, The Gay Blade, which was released in 1981, makes perfect sense to be playing in Gotham City on that fateful night.
Movies from Joker

The King of Comedy

Aspiring comic Rupert Pupkin attempts to achieve success in show business by stalking his idol, a late night talk-show host who craves his own privacy.
Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
The other Scorsese touchstone in Joker is 1983’s The King of Comedy, about an aspiring comic (De Niro) who fantasizes about becoming famous as a guest on a late night talk show. Like the Joker, De Niro’s Rupert Pupkin initially experiences delusions of appearing on his favorite TV show, then makes that dream into a reality. (Or perhaps he is driven so insane he can no longer distinguish between reality and fantasy.) More King of Comedy homages in Joker: Both characters rehearse their TV appearances alone in their houses, both use acts of violence to fulfill their dreams of stardom, both become celebrated by the public despite their immoral acts, and both still live with their mothers.
Movies from Joker

Taxi Driver

A mentally unstable Vietnam War veteran works as a night-time taxi driver in New York City where the perceived decadence and sleaze feeds his urge for violent action, attempting to save a preadolescent prostitute in the process.
Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Joker’s structure leans very heavily on two different Martin Scorsese films. The first is Taxi Driver, the 1976 movie about a loner named Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro, who co-stars in Joker) who slowly succumbs to loneliness and madness before going on a mass killing spree. Besides the generally similar story arc here are a few more details the two films share: Both protagonists write their dark thoughts in journals, both fixate on powerful political figures, both have delusional thoughts that make it tough to tell whether every moment onscreen is really happening, both characters completely change their physical appearance as part of their mental breakdown, and both characters mime blowing their own brains out by pointing finger guns at their temples.
Books from Joker

A Clockwork Orange

In this nightmare vision of a not-too-distant future, fifteen-year-old Alex and his three friends rob, rape, torture and murder - for fun. Alex is jailed for his vicious crimes and the State undertakes to reform him - but how and at what cost?
Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
When it was time to cast The Joker, Ledger was “hungry” for the part, and “had a vision for something.” Nolan helped Ledger see that vision through, starting with suggested reading of Francis Bacon’s work and Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange.
TV Shows from Joker

Frasier

After many years spent at the “Cheers” bar, Frasier moves back home to Seattle to work as a radio psychiatrist after his policeman father gets shot in the hip on duty.
Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Do you remember that bar last July? Of course, they had a hockey match on TV and the Joker wanted to watch "Frasier", so he killed everyone in the place.
Music from Joker

Welcome To The Jungle

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Joker’s anthem to his precious playground…Gotham City. For a city full of corruption, scum, and villainy, this classic GNR hit perfectly sums up the Joker’s outlook on Gotham. Yes, it’s a bad place to live, but that’s why he loves it. It’s the perfect place to have fun. “Welcome to the jungle, we’ve got fun and games…”
Music from Joker

The Joker

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
For someone as narcissistic as the Joker, how could this song NOT make the cut? Odds are, Joker throws this song on while he’s getting dressed up for a night out on the town…possibly to steal some jewels or bomb a theme park, who knows?
Music from Joker

Crazy

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Can’t the Joker have a song to gel to? Sometimes you need a song to reflect to after a beating, and we know Joker has suffered his share of beat-downs in the past. This song highlights the Joker’s more sincere side…a song that he can relate to. Hey, in Joker’s mind, he knows he’s crazy, but he also thinks everybody else is denying their insanity. “Maybe I’m crazy, maybe you’re crazy, maybe we’re crazy…probably.”
Music from Joker

Yummy, Yummy, Yummy

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
What does Joker blast in the streets when he’s trying to persuade Batman to come out and play? As twisted as he is, this classic rock song would be the Joker’s perfect background medley while awaiting his arch nemesis and best buddy, Batsy. His sadistic interpretation of the relatively simple and sweet lyrics are sure to make even his henchmen feel a bit on edge.
Music from Joker

Tiptoe Through The Tulips

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Tiptoe Through the Tulips features the eerie falsetto of Tiny Tim, and is a creepy concoction of bright lyrics and ukulele that are sure to make even the most kind hearted listeners cringe. Let’s face it, the Joker probably has a pretty twisted taste of music, as he does with everything else in his life. Seems like this song could easily be blasted on repeat in Joker’s hideout while he waits for his henchmen to come back from a night out in Gotham.
Music from Joker

Joker's Song

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Being the occasional 4th wall breaker that he is, Joker also probably loves any real world song that is dedicated to him. Such as “One Bad Day" by Bobaflex, “Backstabber” by Eminem, and “Joker's Song” by Miracle of Sound.
Music from Joker

Infinite

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Being the occasional 4th wall breaker that he is, Joker also probably loves any real world song that is dedicated to him. Such as “One Bad Day" by Bobaflex, “Backstabber” by Eminem, and “Joker's Song” by Miracle of Sound.
Music from Joker

One Bad Day

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Being the occasional 4th wall breaker that he is, Joker also probably loves any real world song that is dedicated to him. Such as “One Bad Day" by Bobaflex, “Backstabber” by Eminem, and “Joker's Song” by Miracle of Sound.
Music from Joker

I Go Looney (feat. Mark Hamill)

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
The song that he sang to Commissioner Gordon in the Killing Joke.
Music from Joker

Swamp - 2005 Remaster

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
David Byrne has a particularly manic, confused quality that exemplifies the Joker's state of mind, I think. Two songs by The Talking Heads come to mind: Slippery People and Swamp.
Goods from Joker

Joker's Joy Buzzer

Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
Joker's joy buzzer was a prank tool used by the clown prince of crime. It was often strapped to the palm of his hand as a regular joy buzzer. The first version of the tool was placed on the Joker's utility belt, and it was used to stun enemies temporarily. Joker's joy buzzer was a prank tool used by the clown prince of crime. It was often strapped to the palm of his hand as a regular joy buzzer.
Goods from Joker

Clown Squirt Flower

1 Flower. Fits most teens and adults. Yellow synthetic fabric sunflower with red rubber squeezer. For fun and wacky entertainment, costume parties or variety of entertainment
Joker
Joker
Fictional Character
The Joker committed crimes with his comedic weapons which included his famous acid-spewing flower that was always tucked into his lapel. The infamous flower that the Joker wore in his lapel sprayed (at any given time) acid, poisonous laughing gas, water, knock out gas, or nothing at all. The flower's colors varied over the years, but were usually yellow or purple.